Friday, August 11, 2006

Hold that brahma

I'll be brief. I ought to be brief because of jusitified concerns over the danger of boring (any) readers who chance upon this site; but that doesn't worry me, because my powers of self-criticism aren't well enough developed to make me think of things like that. So I'll be brief because I'm cream crackered. Yesterday was a very tiring day, ending early today after the return journey from the last race at Folkestone's evening meeting. Even if it hadn't been a long day with a lot to worry about, it would still have been a tiring one, because Chilly Cracker could have been renamed Hold That Tiger in the preliminaries as she realised that she hadn't, after all, been retired. But it was also a good day, with all three horses running well. The two most pleasing moments of the day, though, weren't connected to the races. The first involved Mozie Cat, who was supposed to be very hard to load into a horse-box. I decided to take her with us to Folkestone because, so I was told, Chilly Cracker doesn't like to travel alone, and I was really, really pleased when Mozie just walked straight onto the box. They were a sweet pair of fillies all day, but poor Chilly did start having flashbacks of panic when I led her to the pre-parade ring, and thence to the saddling box, and then to the mounting yard. Which brought us to pleasing moment number two. As she was dragging me around the ring, George Baker, who used to ride her quite often for Reg Hollinshead, walked past and said, "She's a lot more relaxed than when I used to ride her". This, too, made me very pleased. So, all things considered, a good day.

Since getting home I have seen replays of our two runners at Yarmouth, and those were good to watch. I also watched the replay of Andrew Hollis' debutant at Yarmouth, Northern Jem, who ran a really nice race and should be a very nice horse. The winner, by Fusaichi Pegasus, put up an impressive performance, but he had already had a run and it showed, whereas Andrew's horse's lack of a previous race was equally obvious. I wouldn't be surprised if Northern Jem turns out the best of the horses from the race.

I have also now seen the 2100m maiden race from yesterday's Haydock card, which was a cracker. Two horses were of particular interest. Most obvious was Mulaazem, the King's Best ex Harayir colt who had looked lovely, but in need of the run, when narrowly beaten by Desert Authority, the pair a mile clear of the rest, at Sandown the day Brief ran there last month. (Thank you Peter, by the way, for filling me in on Desert Authority's maternal grandsire Panoramic; sounds as if that's a name which isn't going to crop up in pedigrees too often. It's a pity one of our more regular bloggers couldn't have come up with that oil, but they seem too preoccupied with details less germane to the general direction of stable- and racing-related web discussion which I'm trying to encourage). Mulaazem was odds-on favourite yesterday and duly won, but only in a three-way photo, which also included a horse which I'd seen putting in an uncooperative show in a stalls session on the Heath a few weeks ago. This was the long-awaited Falpiase, the four-year-old Montjeu half-brother (well, a bit more than half-) to Falbrav whose debut was delayed until yesterday because of his unruly behaviour. He ran a great race to finish third and I think that we'll hear a lot more about him. I'll be surprised if Luca can't guide him to the winner's enclosure for some big races.

So that's three horses to follow from yesterday: Falpiase, Northern Jem and Mulaazem (who retains his position on this blog's horses-to-follow list). On our own list, By Storm, Limit Down and Chilly Cracker have all-reinforced their positions, but then we look on our own animals with rose-tinted spectacles - but even so, Lady Suffragette's position on this list is currently under suspension awaiting further evaluation. She didn't cover herself in glory on Wednesday, but she's only young so we won't sack her just yet.

Just one point I'll throw up in the air. Having mentioned Fusaichi Pegasus, would it be fair to say that he has made a disappointing lack of impression as a stallion so far? Am I being harsh? Or am I just not paying attention to what's going on around me, and failing to notice a regular stream of better-class winners which he's churning out. Does anyone have any views on that? Hold That Tiger doesn't have to be the only stallion under discussion.

15 comments:

Commander Collings said...

Fusaichi Pegasus: over-rated, over-priced and over there.

D.D. Fan Club said...

Lets not be too harsh about this stallion as I dont think he has got to a point where he can be fairly assessed. From an Oz point he has only just finished his second season with runners and finished 5th on prize money, 3rd= on number of wins and first on number of stakes winners on the leading second crop sires table.Thats more stakes winners than More Than Ready, Singspiel and Iglesia( quality speed sire).Im sure when they start racing on the QLD country dirt tracks, you will see a huge improvement in his statistics.Certainly,I for one will be happy to except any offspring of Fusaichi Pegasus at Scott St come 17 January.

Commander Collings said...

Fair comment but Singspiel has done amazingly well in Australia considering he only had around 50 foals from his sole crop.

D.D. Fan Club said...

There is no denying the fact that Singspiel's results are from a smaller crop but he too can look forward to having winners outback boosting his statistics. We all will be in a better position in 12 months time to assess their value to breeders. Nice to see you are still flying the Darley flag.

alamshar2 said...

What's the betting on a Fusaichi Pegasus and a Singspiel going head to head in a class 1 at Charters Towers (is there a racecourse there? I'll be disappointed if there isn't) in a couple of years' time? Even in a maiden, perhaps? The winner of that race could then be exported to race in the UK (on the same flight as an Iglesia, which will have been bought as a jumper). Could end up being one of G.Boss' Shergar Cup mounts in 2010. I hope that Boss will have upped his international game by then, because he looked like a fish out of water today. The poms, ably captained by Jason Weaver, were just too good again.

D.D. Fan Club said...

Please explain what exactly J. Weavers input was. I take it from your comments that Glen Boss was as effective as Weaver was on his trips down under.

alamshar2 said...

Funnily enough, Weaver did have a role to play, because the two captains, M.Roberts being the other, rode in a match race before the proper racing started, the winner getting points towards his team's total. And "the fat man", as the At The Races presenters called the UK & Ire capt, duly saluted. I presume the weights must have been evened out, because Jason would now be a couple of stone heavier than Roberts. Otherwise, the captains' contribution was that they had to study form and took it in turns to pick horses for their team (it was then decided by random ballot which of the tema rode what), so that each captain had to use his knowledge to get the best horses for his men (and woman) to ride. Weaver had advantage here, living in Newmarket rather than South Africa, but I'm sure that Roberts would have taken advice on which horses had best chances.

Boss was terrible, the embodiment of OJS in the 2-miler. His wore himself out by waterskiing in the first half of the race, thus encourageing his mount to reef and tear, and completely failed to run out the distance. You'll note in the close-up that the horse was eased final two furlongs, but that was only because the hoop was too tired to continue to "push" - and that's using push in its broadest sense. And to think they could have had McEvoy on the side instead without having had to pay an airfare.

But the overseas side should have been given bonus points for not including anyone currently facing charges for race-fixing.

montreal moonbeam said...

The quality of postings on this blog appear to have improved greatly in the last few days.

Sinndar1 said...

From a very unbiased point of view, I think Fu Peg is a good stallion........He suffers from the reputation that some may be a little fragile. But his results in the US, stand up to scrutany.

joff said...

One name who thinks Fu Peg's terrific value is Fasliyev. He was more than happy to pass on the breeding industry whipping boy baton.
The Fu Pegs here are generally considered over-priced, unruly and without the talent to make them worth the trouble.
He's had stellar mares to him from day one so it's hard to cut him much slack.
It's amazing how smelly a stallion's reputation can get here. And how quickly. Just ask Octagonal.

D.D. Fan Club said...

I agree with Sinndar1. From what ive picked up on they are some what delicate. Dare I state,I am sure when his offsring get cheap enough for the smaller stables with a more hands on approach, you may find this stallion will more than hold his own.Just load up the Coolmore truck and point it north.

Sinndar1 said...

Fasliyev another good stallion ruined by putting his price up too quickly following an excellent first year. 2nd season runners seldom do aswell as the first crop and therefore a 70K fee looked way too hefty to the commercial market.

Stato-man said...

HOLD THAT WINNING POST

First to know......
Australian rumour-file can confirm that after 18 years, Father Joe is relinquishing the great Australian oricle WINNING POST to Peter Sidwell, publisher of Best Bets.
Word is that both these Austarlian icons will continue independently and there is consideration for a mid-week edition and a possibly a monthly....and a ceratin guru will head up the advertising section for all four....

Watch this space....

Stato-man said...

HOLD THAT WINNING POST

Stato-man said...

HOLD THAT WINNING POST